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  • SCOTT MARK | Teaching Experience

    Acerca de Teaching Expereince Continue Continue CDI College - Courses Taught: ITC 4 - Introduction to Computers Summary: This 40 hour course is a broad-based introduction to using a personal computer. It teaches the fundamentals of an operating system and the most popular application software including word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations. Taught in: September 2021 ​ SCL4: Sociology Summary: This 40 hour course provides knowledge of the workings and interaction of people in society, how it will aid the student in understanding how their social environment influences people. Time is also spent highlighting relevant social problems, exploring: an Introduction to Sociology, Culture, Socialization, The Social Base, Social Institutions, Crime and Deviance, and Ethnic Relations Taught in : September 2021 ​ Bow Valley College Courses Taught JUST 1101 – Introduction to the Criminal Justice System Summary: This course provides an overview of Canada's criminal justice system. It focuses on the historical, theoretical, substantive, and procedural aspects of the police, the courts, and corrections as well a show each institution functions in society. Learners examine how these institutions were created and how they are influenced by governmental regulation, private and public oversight, and their underlying philosophies. Learners delve into the relationships between crime control theory and criminal justice policy; crime rates and justice statistics; the role of police and their operations; the court system; and corrections. Taught in Term(s): Winter 2019 JUST 1102 – Diversity and Criminal Justice in Canada Summary: This course examines multiculturalism and its relationship to the criminal justice system in Canada. Among the issues discussed are the recognition, acceptance, and affirmation of ethnic, racial, and religious diversity within the framework of Canada’s policy of multiculturalism. Particular emphasis is placed on Aboriginal history and traditions. Special attention is focused on the application of these issues to policing, corrections, and other aspects of the criminal justice system. Students will have the opportunity to develop the sensitivities and skills which will assist them in understanding and working with different cultures, and to be responsive to the needs and expectations of culturally diverse communities. Taught in Term(s): Fall 2020 JUST 1601 – Criminology Summary: This course provides an introduction to the major historical and contemporary theoretical concepts of crime, criminals, and criminality. The course establishes the theoretical relationship between criminology and other sciences like psychology and sociology. In addition, the course also delves into the use of the physical sciences and explores the effects of their use in criminal matters. Taught in Term(s): Spring 2020 JUST 2103 – Introduction to Law Enforcement Summary: This course provides a broad overview of the history and the development of modern policing. Police work in a democratic society, police structure of governance, and the current trends in Canadian law enforcement are examined. In addition, legal powers of police and various models of policing will be analyzed in the context of current trends and issues. Taught in Term(s): Fall 2017, Fall 2018(x2), Fall 2019(x2), Fall 2020, Fall 2021(x2) JUST 2104 – Introduction to Forensic Science Summary: This course explores the history of forensic science, and the role forensics play in contemporary investigations in the Canadian criminal justice system. Learners will focus on crime scene management and processing, using a wide variety of forensic techniques, for a many different types of evidence Taught in Term(s): Winter 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Fall 2021(x2) JUST 2202 – Criminal Law in Canada Summary: In this course learners explore the function of criminal law in Canada, with a focus on the Criminal Code. Learners examine the Criminal Code of Canada to understand offences described within. Learners practice identifying elements of a case in order to recommend a criminal offense and describe the associated penalty. Taught in Term(s): Winter 2021 JUST 2503 – Criminal Procedure Summary: This course deals with criminal procedure issues that relate to law enforcement. The course examines the procedural requirements of the criminal justice system as they relate to the role of the law enforcement officer. Activities within that role include: search and seizure, charging, arrest, detention, interrogation, and warrants. The learner analyzes pre-trial procedures and trial processes Taught in Term(s): Fall 2019(x2), Fall 2002(x2) JUST 2606 – Criminal Evidence Summary: This course examines criminal evidence issues around policing, principles, and problems as those issues relate to evidence in criminal proceedings. Learners analyze Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms issues in relation to the collection, preservation, and use of evidence. In addition, the course focuses on evidentiary concerns such as witnesses, questioning, and the challenges facing the forensic community. Taught in Term(s): Winter 2019(x2), Winter 2020(x2) JUST 2607 – Interviewing & investigation Summary: Interviewing victims, witnesses, and suspects is fundamental to investigation. Learners explore basic investigative responsibilities and key skills required to conduct effective interviews. They examine case law and statutes to be considered during interviews and interrogations. Taught in Term(s): Winter 2019, Winter 2020, Winter 2021(x2) LEGL 1101 – Introduction to Canadian Law Summary: This course provides an overview of Canadian civil and criminal law, its history, and structure. The civil law component provides the learner with foundational knowledge of the operation civil legal systems and the interests involved. The course explores Canadian criminal law through the examination of constitutional law, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the substantive and procedural law contained in the Criminal Code. Taught in Term(s): Winter 2018, Winter 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Fall 2021 Bow Valley College Curriculum Development: The following courses were created, and all curriculum and assessments were developed by myself: ​ JUST 2104 – Introduction to Forensic Science Developed 3 credit course as a part of the Criminal Justice Diploma program. The course is currently an elective for all specializations in the program. Summary: This course explores the history of forensic science, and the role forensics play in contemporary investigations in the Canadian criminal justice system. Learners will focus on crime scene management and processing, using a wide variety of forensic techniques, for a many different types of evidence JUST 2304 – Crisis Management for Law Enforcement Developed 3 credit course as a part of the Criminal Justice Diploma program. The course is currently a requirement for all Law Enforcement Specializations, and an elective for General Justice or Corrections specialization. Summary: This course examines crises and conflicts that law enforcement personnel encounter. Although no two crises or conflicts are the same, learners explore common factors that may be involved, such as stress, mental health, and abuse. In addition, learners examine effective intervention and de-escalation strategies that may be engaged by law enforcement personnel. ​ In addition to creating and developing the previously mentioned courses, I have also reviewed, updated, and redesigned the following courses: JUST 2202 – Criminal Law in Canada JUST 2503 – Criminal Procedure JUST 2607 – Interviewing & investigation LEGL 1101 – Introduction to Canadian Law ​ Professional Development Courses Taught Introduction to Forensics Organization: Calgary Police Service Course Run: Sept 2017, Jan 2018, Sept 2018. Summary: This 20 hour course was designed to provide a basic awareness for members of the Calgary Police Service (CPS) of the roles and responsibilities for the CPS Forensic Crime Scenes Unit; as well as provide a knowledge base regarding forensic techniques that may be able to offer additional information for their investigations from a forensic perspective. In addition to facilitating this course, I was also the creator and curriculum developer. Assistant Crime Scene Examiner Organization: Calgary Police Service Course Run: Oct 15 – 19, 2018 Summary: This 40 hour course was designed to provide learners with the knowledge and skills necessary to identify, secure, and process crime scenes using a variety of forensic techniques. During this course I facilitated involvement from multiple sections of the CPS, as well as lead the assessment of the learners in both formative practical scenarios, and summative written examinations. In addition to facilitating this course, I was also the curriculum and assessment developer. Friction Ridge Identification Organization: Calgary Police Service Course Run: Nov 2017, and Nov 2018 Summary: This 40 hour course was to provide an introduction to Dactyloscopy which is the analysis and comparison of fingerprints for the purpose of identification. As an introduction, this course was not intended to provide sufficient training for qualification as an expert, or for certification as a friction ridge examiner. However, the course providesdetailed information on: friction ridge skin; processes used to locate, document, and collect fingerprints; as well as philosophy and methodologies for fingerprint identification. In addition to facilitating this course, I was also the curriculum and assessment developer. Hazardous Environment Recognition & Evidence Collection Organization: Calgary Police Service Course Run: Aug 2018 Summary: This course was been designed with the overall learning objective of increasing police investigators awareness, knowledge, and ability to recognize hazardous environments involving unknown powders, drug manufacturing, or other toxic substances. This course covered both theoretical knowledge and practical skills focusing on proper donning, doffing, and decontamination. As well as exhibit packing, collection, and understanding the potential for forensic evidence that may be retrieved in such an environment. In addition to facilitating this course, through collaboration with University of Calgary Chemistry Department, Calgary Fire Department HAZMAT, The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Health Canada’s Vancouver Drug Analysis Service Laboratory and RCMP Clandestine Lab Enforcement and Response. I was also the creator, as well as the curriculum and assessment developer. Advanced Forensic Training Course Organization: INTERPOL Course Run: July 2019 Summary: This course was designed through collaboration with INTERPOL, who were hosting the course for a diverse group of investigators from Southern and Easter Africa. This course took place in Mauritius, with the support of both INTERPOL and Mauritius Police. In addition to facilitating this course, I was also the curriculum and assessment developer. ​ Fingerprint Identification Course Organization: Uganda Police Course Run: September 2021 Summary: This course was designed through collaboration with Uganda Police, and was provided as a synchronous and asynchronous online course. Over a 40 hour period participants in this course were provided with a detailed understanding of friction ridge impression (fingerprint) evidence. From the ability to recognize and describe factors which allow for friction ridge impressions to be individualized, to conducting a detailed analysis and what is involved in forming an opinion on the comparison of friction ridge impressions. In addition to a review of the strengths and weaknesses of such a process, and how to articulate findings or conclusions in a expert report.

  • FINGERPRINTS | Mark-Forensics

    FINGERPRINT PATTERN TYPES Loop Impression. ​ Developed with Cyanoacrylate Fuming, followed by Rhodamine 6G dye stain, and visualized under Forensic Light Source. ​ Then digitally enhanced with Adobe Photoshop Hover here to see more Tented Arch Impression ​ ​ Developed with Cyanoacrylate Fuming, followed by Brilliant Yellow dye stain, and visualized under Forensic Light Source. ​ Then digitally enhanced with Adobe Photoshop Hover here to see more Arch Impression ​ Developed with Cyanoacrylate Fuming, followed by Rhodamine 6G dye stain, and visualized under Forensic Light Source. ​ Then digitally enhanced with Adobe Photoshop Hover here to see more Whorl Impression ​ ​ Developed with Cyanoacrylate Fuming, followed by Ardrox dye stain, and visualized under Forensic Light Source. ​ Then digitally enhanced with Adobe Photoshop Hover here to see more LOOP WHORL TENTED ARCH Arch Pattern Ridge flow from side to side, with slight rise or arch in the flow. It can be compared to a hill or bridge. Plain Language Description of the Pattern Types Tented Arch Ridge flow from side to side, with rise or arch in middle, like an Arch, but it also has at least one ridge that is perpendicular beneath. It can be said to look like a tent pole beneath the arch, or compared to a mountain, in the same way an arch is compared to a hill. Loop Pattern Ridge flow starts on one side, and loops back around the middle, to finish on the same side the ridge began. It may begin and end on the left or right, but if it is an Ulnar or Radial loop will depend what hand it is on. If it flows to and from the little finger side, it's an Ulnar loop, if it flows to and from the thumb side, it's a Radial loop. Even if only one ridge loops back to the same side it came from, it is a loop pattern. (note: if it has two loops, it's a whorl) Plain Whorl Whorl Pattern This is the catch all. If it doesn't fit into the first three, or if it has aspects of two others, it is called a whorl. This is the most varied pattern type. Note: old school curriculums referred to a composite pattern, which is an accidental whorl pattern now (has been for a while). There are several types of Whorl Pattern Fingerprints: Central Pocket Loop Whorl Double Loop Whorl Plain Whorl Accidental Whorl How Do You Find Fingerprints (Friction Ridge Impressions)? ​ Fingerprints can be found on a wide variety of surfaces, many of which may surprise you, using a wide variety of methods during a forensic investigation. However, the key factors to determine how they may be found depend on two main things. 1. What is the substrate (surface the impression is on); and 2. What is the matrix (what is the fingerprint made up of). These two factors will help determine what development process may provide the best chance of developing the impression. At the end of the day it is all about creating a contrast between the substrate and the matrix, to allows the impression to visualized. ​ To begin, the best type of examination to begin with is the use of light. Both white light at varying angles (oblique lighting), and the use of forensic light source and filters. What Is A Fingerprint ​ A fingerprint is made up of sweat pores aligned in a row. Each row containing multiple individual pores, referred to as ridge units. The believed purpose of such skin, is to increase the friction between the skin and whatever it is in contact with. As such, what fingerprints are made up of, is friction ridges, and so they are often referred to as friction ridge impressions. The organization of these ridges are influenced by both genetics, and the environment in which they grow. The random nature of the development process itself, is why they are all unique, and it is a practical impossibility for two to ever be the same! Fingerprint Enhancement ​ To make the small details in a friction ridge impression clear. We often use digital enhancement tools, to aid our ability to observe all the details in the impression. Impression Analysis As we examine an impression, before any comparisons are made. We must first conduct a thorough analysis of all aspects of the impression, and understand what we observe. Fingerprint Comparison ​ After the discovery, documentation, enhancement, and analysis of a friction ridge impression. The next step, is to compare it to other known sources, as we try to make an identification. Although computers can help us narrow the possible sources. It must be a properly trained examiner to make the comparison. During the comparison we select a starting point and move from ridge to ridge, as we conduct the comparison. The only way an individualization can be made, is if it is the same throughout, and any slight differences can be explained! Want to learn more about fingerprints, and what they can provide, in addition to identity! Check out Anatomical Factors More Content Coming Soon ... Click here to join & be notified when new content is available ARCH

  • WORK EXPERIENCE | Scott Mark

    Work Experience Continue Continue Aug 2020 - Current Day Aug 2019 - Current Day May 2019 - Oct 2019 Apr 2017 - May 2019 Apr 2008 - Aug 2019 May 2004 - Apr 2008 Organization: CDI College Position: Law Enforcement Foundations Instructor Description: Instructor for courses in the Law Enforcement Foundations Diploma Program. As well as updating curriculum for current courses in program. ​​ Organization: Bow Valley College Position: Lead Law Enforcement Instructor Description: Primary instructor for all Law Enforcement related courses offered as part of the Justice Studies Diploma Program. As well as course designer for updating current, or developing new courses for the program. ​​ Organization: Bow Valley College Position: Subject Matter Expert Description: Contracted as a Forensic Expert and curriculum designer to create a new JUST 2104: Introduction to Forensic Science course for the program. Organization: Bow Valley College Position: Casual Instructor Description: Sessional instructor for any Law Enforcement related courses offered as part of the Justice Studies Diploma Program Organization: Calgary Police Service Position: Sworn Police Officer Description: Varied duties based upon position held Feb 2015 – Aug 2019 - Forensic Crime Scenes Unit Duties of a Forensic Identification Specialist: Crime Scene examination, photography, exhibit collection and processing, fingerprint identification. Also acted as a supervising Sgt for the teams, as well as administrative Sgt for the Unit, for extended periods of time, as needed. Position also involved operational deployments to Saskatchewan and Nunavut for ongoing investigations. ​ As a member of the Forensic Crime Scenes Unit specifically. I attended in excess of 1,500 requests for assistance, and over 100 of those were major scene investigations. In my time as a forensic specialist, I located in excess of 900 friction ridge impressions at crime scenes or on evidence, and have made more than 800 friction ridge individualizations specifically. My individualizations were composed of deceased identifications and friction ridge impression files for active investigations. In order to complete friction ridge identifications and eliminations for casework, I have completed over 12,000 fingerprint comparisons in casework alone, and tens of thousands more in training. ​ Feb 2014 - Feb 2015 - Interpretive Centre/YouthLink . Seconded to develop and create forensic display for Police Museum and interactive forensic programming as part of the instructional program. ​ Nov 2009 – Feb 2014 - Forensic Crime Scenes Unit Duties of a Forensic Identification Specialist: Crime Scene examination, photography, exhibit collection and processing, fingerprint identification ​ May 2008 – Oct 2009 - District Two Patrol General Police Duties – First responder to calls for service. As a member of the Calgary Police Service in Patrol specifically, I attended thousands of requests for assistance. ​ Apr 2008 – May 2008 - Police Recruit Training Attended Chief Crowfoot Learning Centre for Experienced Officer training to transition to the Calgary Police Service. Organization: Canadian Forces - Military Police Position: NCM - Military Police Officer Description: Varied duties based upon position held Feb 2005 – Apr 2008 Police/Military Duties Location: 4 Wing Cold Lake Duties: First responder to calls for Military Police service, follow up investigations and operational deployments to Inuvik, and Barbados, as required. As a member of the 4-Wing Military Police specifically. I attended hundreds of requests for assistance, as well as conducted Canada Customs clearance for Canadian Forces Personnel returning from overseas. ​ Jul 2004 – Feb 2005 - CF Military Police Academy Location: CFB - Borden Military Police Recruit Training (QL-3) ​ May 2004 - Jun 2004 - Basic Military Qualification Location: CFB - St. Jean Sur Richelieu Basic Military Qualification Course (QL-1) ​ ​

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Forum Posts (49)

  • Forensic Inquiry

    Hi Mark, I teach a High School Forensic Class (Grade 10-12) and I am looking for a Guest Speaker to zoom in for our last couple days of classes. We cover a variety of topics in the forensic class and I was hoping my students could hear from someone else in the field or who has previously worked in Forensic policing and tell them about what they do and what forensic techniques they use. Please let me know if you have any questions and let me know if this is something you are interested in (or know someone who is). Thank you and have a good day, Emma

  • Curriculum

    I am teaching a full year forensics class at the high school I work at next year. Any curriculum I should go off of or any recommendations on where to begin?

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